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Compare/Contrast: Siddhartha, Experience and Education and Pedagogy


silkflowers 2 / 1  
Apr 30, 2007   #1
I read 3 book this semester (Siddhartha, Experience and Education and Pedagogy of the oppressed). I did a paper on each and received an A. My final paper is to compare and contrast all 3 works, write about my educational experience and my educational goal. The problem is I am not quite sure where to start.
EF_Team2 1 / 1,708  
May 1, 2007   #2
Greetings!

Congratulations on receiving As on your papers! The assignment sounds like three separate assignments in one. Perhaps the easiest way to get started would be to write them as if they were three different papers, and then find the best way to tie them together. As you've already written papers on the three works, look for common elements in them to compare first; then, you can probably find points to contrast more easily. Once you've got a rough draft, I'll be happy to help you with editing it!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com
OP silkflowers 2 / 1  
May 4, 2007   #3
This ia another of my final essay that I have to write about my educational experience or my educational journey. This is what I have so far. Please make any suggestion you deem heplful or necessary. I am still trying to put together that compare and contrast essay, thanks for your suggestion on that.

My educational journey has been a complex yet fulfilling. As a child my educational experience was a Traditional one. Growing up in the West Indies which was ruled under the British educational system, the standards were high and the discipline harsh. In preschool and kinder garden the rules were speak only when you are spoken to and answer when you are called. As children we had no voices, opinions or privacy. This proved to be true not only in the class room but also at home. Our attitudes had to be one of docility, receptiveness and obedience. Our Teachers were authoritarians and we were taught never question there authority. They were treated with the outmost respect and their roles were to make sure that we became moral and productive citizen. Since we were thought of as empty vessels to be filled with information, the robotic system was imposed upon us and the freedom of individual opinions or interaction was either limited or non-existent. Disobedience was not tolerated, the rules were very stringent and offenders were severely punished. There were no laws against whipping and the teachers were unforgiving to a disobedient child. We were taught through a robotic system of memorization and repetition. The knowledge of the teachers was espoused on us, without considering our individuality, thoughts or ideas.

This practice was carried over to Primary school and by then we were conditioned to obey the hierarchy that was set in place. We behaved like robots programmed to perform our daily static routine. Education was not just a right, it was also a privilege and because we were privileged, we were expected to excel so that we could function in society. Failing was not an option; failing meant that you were idle, immoral and lazy. It meant that you did not appreciate the privilege of receiving an education and you were a disgrace as well as a disappointment to your family and society on a whole.

By the time I was in ten years of age and in the fifth grade I was preparing for the Common Entrance Examination that all students required to pass to enter into High School. We were notified through the National Paper that you passed or failed and that experience proved to be far too overwhelming for children of such an impressionable age.

Upon being selected to attend a boarding High School, which by all standards was the greatest accomplishment for a child entering into high school; my educational experience was both traditional and progressive, though mostly traditional. We were allowed to actively participate in an open dialogue with our teachers and exchange ideas and opinions, thought they were limits set on the content of dialogue allowed in the classroom. After class however, the interaction between student and teacher was that of an older sibling or a close relative. There was a more relaxed atmosphere, where we could talk freely without being deemed disrespectful or crossing the boundaries of the student teacher relationship. If we had any concerns or complaints we were afforded the opportunity to discuss it with a teacher that we were comfortable with. This experience proved to be a positive one because our ideas, thoughts and opinions were not disregarded. They were taken into consideration, though there were boundaries set.

During my high school years I migrated to the United States and my educational experience was traditional and progressive. The traditional aspect was the academic structure set forth to prepare for regents exams. There was no deviation from the curriculum it was followed right down to the last detail. On the other hand the progressive part of my experience was the freedom of speech allowed in the classroom between the student and teacher. The freedom was so much that their seemed to be no boundaries set between teacher and students and there were times when I was unsure of whom the authority was. The issue of morality was totally lacking and most of the students were extremely disrespectful to both the teachers and their peers.

My experience in college however, proved to be somewhat different, the academic standards were strictly adhered to and the morality issue was held with high regards. Though we were all adults, we respected the professor's authority and disagreed, argued, discussed and challenged in a respectful manner. Overall my educational journey proved to be mostly positive and it prepared me to become the successful and productive citizen that I am today.
EF_Team2 1 / 1,708  
May 4, 2007   #4
Greetings!

You've written a very good essay! Here are my editing suggestions:

My educational journey has been [delete "a"] complex yet fulfilling. As a child my educational experience was a traditional one. Growing up in the West Indies, which was ruled under the British educational system, I found the standards were high and the discipline harsh. In preschool and kindergarten, the rules were to speak only when you are spoken to and answer when you are called.

Our attitude [no "s"] had to be one of docility, receptiveness and obedience. Our teachers were authoritarians and we were taught never to question their [not "there"] authority. They were treated with the outmost respect and their roles were to make sure that we became moral and productive citizens.

a disappointment to your family and society as [not "on"] a whole.

By the time I was [delete "in"] ten years of age and in the fifth grade I was preparing for the Common Entrance Examination that all students are required to pass to enter into High School.

...though [no "t"] there [not "they"] were limits set on the content of dialogue allowed in the classroom.

There was no deviation from the curriculum; it was followed right down to the last detail.

The freedom was so much that there [not "their"] seemed to be no boundaries set between teacher and students and there were times when I was unsure of who [delete "m"] the authority was.

My experience in college however, proved to be somewhat different. The academic standards were strictly adhered to and the morality issue was held in [not "with"] high regard [no "s"].

You've certainly experienced the gamut in educational styles! Very interesting essay!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com


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