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'incredibly rewarding career' sociology journal response


superkaytee 10 / 30  
Feb 26, 2007   #1
I have to write A JOURNAL RESPONSE on this title.

How and in what ways do the fictional accounts of learning, society, values and beliefs speak personally and professionally to me about the teacher I would like to be?

We were given to readings on the experiences of two teachers to spring board our thoughts from.I was told to write using "I", including Why i want to be a teacher and what kind of teacher I would like to be. The lecturer wants to see inner depth.

How should i go about starting this kind of a response?Its not a long response.approx 4 pages.

Any ideas???
EF_Team2 1 / 1,708  
Feb 27, 2007   #2
Greetings!

This is a very personal sort of response, so really only you can write it. I'll try to give you an example, though.

You could start with a more general statement and move on to specifics: "The fictional accounts had a profound impact on my perspective about teaching as a profession and my place in that profession." Then you would go on to give examples from the readings and comment on how they affected you.

I hope this gives you some ideas to get started!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com
OP superkaytee 10 / 30  
Feb 27, 2007   #3
Ok thanks for ur advice.The accounts we were given are true so maybe I could open this journal up with a different sentence.
I have started to write but am just not so sure im'deep enough' and doing this correctly.Im really not good with expressing my thoughts on paper!!The note I have included is just what we were told to include.I also havent got to the collaborative part yet am still trying to think of what to write for that. Could you look at what I have wrote and tell me what you think and help me to tie it together.Thanks.I really appreciate it.

[b]Note: always refer to ' I'. Why did u want to become a teacher? What kind of a teacher you would like to be?Look at individualism(disagree) and collaborative cultures-(agree)!!!!Holistic view.

// the version deleted by moderator //
EF_Team2 1 / 1,708  
Feb 28, 2007   #4
Greetings!

I think you have a great start here! I'll give you my editing suggestions:

In my teacher career - say, "In my teaching career"

The reason I would like to be a teacher is because I love working with children, helping them to excel in education and for myself the teacher to be consistent and a stable figure in their educated lives. - This is a run-on sentence. Put a period after education and re-word the last part; it's a bit confusing.

To praise them for their hard work and encourage them to fulfil their dreams. - This is a sentence fragment.

I have dedicated a lot of time in order to fulfill my dream of teaching- it has been my aspiration[delete the 's'] since childhood

but this was never really encouraged out of me - You can say "this was never encouraged in me" or "this was never brought out in me" but not "encouraged out of ..."

'fearas' needed for the week ahead. - Put a question mark at the end, since you asked a question. I've never heard of "fearas" -- is that an Irish word? :-)

Constantly scouring places for items of use in the classroom for teaching aids, recycling items of use for art projects and planning the next terms work. - it's "next term's work."

The teacher needs to have a mixture of qualities otherwise everyone could be teachers. - You need some punctuation in this sentence, perhaps a semicolon after qualities and comma after otherwise. However, the logic of the statement is a bit weak.

Everything discussed on a day to day basis s teaching, lecturer's talk about teaching subjects areas and Hargreaves sums up this idea well when he states ' - This sentence is a bit garbled.

This idea is vastly true, the relationships we secure when training have a huge impact on our future teaching career to relate to staff in the school, principals and students alike. - This is a run-on sentence.

Hargreaves concern as to whether there is something very 'teacherish' (pg.218) about teachers. - Make it possessive: Hargreaves' concern.

Keep working on it -- good job!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com
OP superkaytee 10 / 30  
Feb 28, 2007   #5
yes 'fearas' is Irish word for equipment or resources. I'm ising it cos the author of on eof the readings refers to it.

ive added some more which i would love for u to edit for me.
The q i have left in the middle is cos i might add some more on that when i tink of what to write!!!thx

Sociology Journal

How and in what ways do the fictional accounts of learning, society, values and beliefs speak personally and professionally to me about the teacher I would like to be?

Teaching is a job based around developing knowledge and nurturing individuals- I feel that it would be an incredibly rewarding career and help to safeguard our future generations. Young minds are incredibly vulnerable and can be influenced very easily- I believe that with the correct education, this influence can be extremely positive and beneficial. In my teacher career, I aim to pass on invaluable knowledge to several generations via several multi sensory methods, including...'??

The reason I would like to be a teacher is because I love working with children, helping them to excel in education and for myself the teacher to be consistent and a stable figure in their educated lives. To praise them for their hard work and encourage them to fulfil their dreams. I have dedicated a lot of time in order to fulfill my dream of teaching- it has been my aspirations since childhood, a driving force behind my motivation to succeed. Despite enjoying my school years, I always felt that I could do more and be better, but this was never really encouraged out of me: I want to show my pupils that intelligence isn't just being good at sums, but can evolve in many forms, such as communication. I want to be able to encourage and nurture my pupils in order to allow each of them to achieve their absolute best so they do not have the regrets I am left with from my school days.

McGahern's reason for accepting a place on the teacher training course was because "the teaching hours were short. There were long holidays. I would not have to think about money" (pg.208). I cannot agree with McGahern's reasons of choice. The teaching day is from 9 a.m. till 3 p.m. in most schools Monday to Friday but this is only when the children go home. What about the endless hours of effort put in by teachers for the schemes of work, plans and 'fearas' needed for the week ahead. The organisation of a teacher's day is well prepared days before the teaching of the subject takes place. Of course, the months of July and August are holidays to the teachers and the children but children as well as teachers need a break from learning in the classroom and take in their natural environment. I believe there is no such thing as a 'difficult' pupil: children will only misbehave if they are not challenged sufficiently. In order to prevent disruptions in class I aim to keep all my pupils engaged by providing new and fun challenges for them everyday.

Whilst during the holidays, the teachers may be out of the classroom, but a real teacher is never 'off-duty'. Constantly scouring places for items of use in the classroom for teaching aids, recycling items of use for art projects and planning the next terms work.

To be an excellent teacher needs great commitment, reliability, a good personality and warmth for children. A teacher needs to be good all round in every subject area. The teacher needs to have a mixture of qualities otherwise everyone could be teachers. To be a teacher now in the 21st Century, I feel still enjoys a high status in society though as not as highly paid as looked upon. Overall teaching is a very satisfying and rewarding experience.

After reading Hargreaves account regarding the cultures of teaching, it gave me a different perspective of how teachers form and develop. I can see how teachers develop certain characteristics from being together in classes, paired up on teaching practice, learn from each others mistakes and offer advice on how to teach an area differently if they find it's not working for them.

It's true that the student teachers socialise more with other student teachers on the course than other people as the course is so intense and time consuming. Everything discussed on a day to day basis s teaching, lecturer's talk about teaching subjects areas and Hargreaves sums up this idea well when he states '

'The way teachers relate to their colleagues has profound implications for their teaching in the classroom, how they evolve and develop as teachers and the sorts of teachers they become'.

This idea is vastly true, the relationships we secure when training have a huge impact on our future teaching career to relate to staff in the school, principals and students alike. The strategies of different teachers forms the framework of the culture that evolves to form the identity of all teachers. Hargreaves concern as to whether there is something very 'teacherish' (pg.218) about teachers. I feel this line rings true when looking at the course I am attending. Some of my colleagues I felt looked very 'teacherish' from the moment they stepped into the lecture hall whereas others have formed into the culture within the class. This attitude has evolved I think from lessons learnt from other teaching experiences, the people that I communicate with and getting into the role of the teacher we want to become. I don't think it is a certain look- I think it is the way we perceive the individual. It is just a professional manner and an ability to communicate ideas on all levels.

A successful teacher has a strong presence in the room- this draws people's attention to them and therefore means children are naturally captivated and engaged by them. Based on my own personal experience, I have found that pupils tend to remember the more captivating and exciting lessons above the mundane alternatives. I believe that the success of a lessons hinges completely on the ability of the teacher to engage their pupils in the ideas being taught: you can have the best planned class, with the most exciting tasks, but if it is not delivered in a way which inspires and excites the pupils they will not fully digest the information provided.

At looking at the culture that has evolved into individualism, I can see how teachers can be isolated from their other colleagues, teaching behind closed doors and only socialising for a limited amount of time to eat their lunch and discuss safe conversation starters. Though this could be argued that staffrooms are a place of relaxation for a teacher, after having to stand up and perform in front of the children all day. It is a time to switch off from talking about their teaching ideas and thus reducing the participation of sharing thoughts and tips. This culture could provide a private environment for the teacher but could also negatively reinforce certain teaching practices thus not gaining any support but staying secured and rigid in their teaching practices. It can be safe choice for some, teaching within own perimeters without any criticism but lacking any value or support.

In the limited schools where the culture of collaboration prevails, it is the openness and unitedness of every teacher that forms the bond. I strongly agree that collaboration of colleagues and team mates help form a better school environment for both teacher and student by enabling them to share views and opinions in a natural way: again encouraging communication. I understand this type of workmanship has to be developed in order to achieve the most significant results, but as a basic ethos it is definitely a positive starting point.

Coll---break down why it is so effective- how does it influence the pupils education? does it make things more efficient? does it make learning newer and faster?

Throughout my teaching career I wish to employ the collaborative culture by...
I want to motivate youthful minds in order to achieve optimum results
I believe that to become a teacher is a true privilege: to be able to help children evolve into adults, improve their knowledge and understanding and provide a strong grounding for their whole lives is something I am very passionate about. and as a teacher, I most of all want to encourage my pupils to enjoy the experience of learning, as this is a skill they will carry with them for the rest of their lives
EF_Team2 1 / 1,708  
Feb 28, 2007   #6
Greetings!

You've been working hard! To my previous editiorial comments, I will add:

"I believe that the success of a lesson[delete "s"] hinges completely on the ability of the teacher to engage pupils in the ideas being taught" - I deleted "their" because "the teacher" is singular and "their" is plural. You could say "his or her pupils," too.

"At looking at the culture that has evolved into individualism" - "At looking at" is awkward; try "In looking at"

"Though this could be argued that staffrooms are a place of relaxation for a teacher, after having to stand up and perform in front of the children all day." - A fragment; change "Though this" to "It"; you can add "however," after "argued."

"This culture could provide a private environment for the teacher but could also negatively reinforce certain teaching practices -- thus not gaining any support but staying secured and rigid in their teaching practices." - I added an em-dash, as it needed some punctuation there.

It can be a safe choice for some, teaching within their own perimeters without any criticism, but lacking any value or support."

"something I am very passionate about. And as a teacher, "

This essay has a smoother flow than the one you were having trouble with earlier -- good job!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com


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