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Reference Citation and Bibliography


lawenforcer 3 / 2  
Nov 27, 2006   #1
Hi I was just wondering if you could find anything wrong with my citation and bibliography

Reference Citation

Suzuki, D. (August 18, 2006). Public doesn't understand global warming. Science Matters.

Suzuki, D. (July 7, 2006). New act could ban dangerous pesticides. Science Matters.

Mckibben, B. The environmental issue from hell. In D. Spears (Ed.), Improving Reading Skills

David Suzuki. (2006). In Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Suzuki, D. (Director/Researcher), Walker, D (Producer). (1998). Nature of Things: Nuclear Power

Suzuki, D. & Dressel, H. (2002). Good news for a change: How everyday people are helping the planet. Toronto, ON: Stoddart Publishing Co

Suzuki, D. (August 18, 2006). Public doesn't understand global warming. Science Matters.

(Thesis statement is David Suzuki made us aware of the threat humanity poses to the natural environment through its careless misuse of chemicals and gases)

Bibliography

David Suzuki tested the general public on global warming and discovered that the public has mixed knowledge of what this major environmental issue is. Some of the examples he gives us of the causes of global warming include industries and vehicles that use fossil fuels, and aerosol cans that use CFCs. Furthermore, he assumes by now everyone should have basic knowledge of the issue and consequences of global warming. Suzuki believes, given the media bombardment surrounding global warming, people must surely be aware of this problem. In his opinion the public and governments should view this as the primary problem today.

Suzuki, D. (July 7, 2006). New act could ban dangerous pesticides. Science Matters.

David Suzuki believes the new Pest Control Act is important for protecting the safety of Canadians from hazardous pesticides and agrees pesticide manufacturers should reveal why their products remain legal and available to Canadians. He mentions that Canadian jurisdiction fails to protect the public from dangerous chemicals in pesticides. Some chemicals he lists are atrazine and 1,3-dichlororopene which are banned by OECD nations. David Suzuki proves the false belief of pesticide manufacturers, that their products do not harm human health, with extensive evidence. Some evidence of the negative effects he gives us of pesticides are impairment of reproduction , disruption of hormone levels, developmental defects, high toxicity of the liver and kidneys, and high risks of developing Parkinson's disease. David Suzuki concludes b pointing out that it is the government's duty to protect the safety of its citizens' health.

Suzuki, D. & Dressel, H. (2002). Good news for a change: How everyday people are helping the planet. Toronto, ON: Stoddart Publishing Co.

David Suzuki states there is a consequence for taking metals and fossil fuels from beneath the ground. Some examples of the consequences he gives us for taking metals and fossil fuels are harm to plants, crops, animals, and harm to health of adolescents. He mentions the public should worry about harmful greenhouse gases which are a result of burning wood, coal, and oil. David Suzuki believes alternate fuel sources and better care for trees are a good solution to our economic problem concerning our atmosphere. Some of the alternate fuel sources he advises us to increasingly use are wind, solar, and hydrogen power, which he hopes become more common within business and among nations.
EF_Team2 1 / 1,708  
Nov 27, 2006   #2
Greetings!

I would be happy to go over these for you, but first I need to know--were you asked to use APA style, or some other?

Let me know and I'll go over them (probably in the morning!)

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com
OP lawenforcer 3 / 2  
Nov 28, 2006   #3
APA style. Sorry, should have mentioned that.
EF_Team2 1 / 1,708  
Nov 28, 2006   #4
Greetings!

That's OK. I was pretty sure it must be APA, since your topics are scientific, but I had to check.

First of all, the APA format doesn't use the footnote style for citations; it calls for in-text citations instead. Footnotes are used for explanatory material. However, many instructors want their students to cite with footnotes, even if that's not strictly kosher. In that case, you have to wing it, since APA doesn't have rules for footnote citations. What I do is use the bibliographic APA format, just like you've done.

As to that format, you're very close to right. Your entries just need a little tweaking.

Here's your first one:

Suzuki, D. (August 18, 2006). Public doesn't understand global warming. Science Matters. Retrieved November 10, 2006, from, davidsuzuki.org

The author is done correctly, but you need to switch the order of the date: (2006, August 18).
Italicize Science Matters. Since this is an electronic source, you are right to include the date of retrieval, but you need to take out the comma after "2006" (and the one after "from," which I'm sure was an accident). The web address should be given in its entirety. What I usually do is go to the page I am citing and copy the whole address out of the window, then paste it on the entry. You'll need a period at the end of the entry (and all entries).

Now to the book:

Mckibben, B. The environmental issue from hell. In D. Spears (Ed.), Improving Reading Skills (pp. 349-355). City College, San Francisco.

Is the "k" in Mckibben supposed to be capitalized? (Just checking!) Everything is correct, with two exceptions: you need to italicize "Improving Reading Skills," and change the "," after the city of publication to ":".

Now the video:

Suzuki, D. (Director/Researcher), Walker, D (Producer). (1998). Nature of Things: Nuclear Power - The Hot Debate [video]. CBC Television

You left out the period after the producer's initial (oops!). Everything else is spot-on (except that final period).

As to the annotated bibliography section: the same rules as above, which means they look good to me!

In case you don't already have a source, a web site I use a lot for APA is:

owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01

They also have a site for MLA.

Good luck with your research. You've done an excellent job!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com
EF_Team2 1 / 1,708  
Nov 28, 2006   #5
Oops, I almost forgot!

Use the hanging indent style for all entries. This means to indent (the standard is .5") on the 2nd and subsequent lines. Most word processing programs have a feature allowing you to format your paragraphs, with "hanging indent" as one of the choices. That's what I use.

Again, good luck!

Sarah, EssayForum.com
sofl 1 / 1  
Oct 25, 2008   #6
Refering to first essay

is it ok to refer to my first essay in my second. Or should i reexplain everything in the second
EF_Team5 - / 1,586  
Oct 25, 2008   #7
Good evening.

Well, if your audience is familiar with your first essay, you absolutely can refer to it in your second piece. If, on the other hand, the audience has had no exposure to the first piece it would make your references to it rather cloudy and lose some of your audience, and in that case you should include at least the most important topics of your first essay in a brief overview so that your audience will be somewhat familiar with the material.

I hope this helps!

Regards,
Gloria
Moderator, EssayForum.com
Sashhhh - / 1  
Feb 28, 2016   #8
Bibliography before or after the illustrations?

Hello! Where should be put the bibliography for a research paper, before or after the illustrations, for example for a archaeology or art history research paper?


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