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"to+VERB-ing" confusion. Few doubts in grammar.


wilde 2 / 3  
Mar 25, 2010   #1
I have a few doubts. Please guide me with good explanation.

1. Help us for getting it. AND Help us to get it.

I guess 2nd one is a correct use.

I want to know the basic difference between the use of "TO+VERB" and "FOR+VERB-ing".

2. I have a confusion for the use of "To+VERB-ing"

Eg. I look forward to receive it.
I look forward to receiving it.

When and how should we use "to+VERB-ing".

Kindly help me.
Thanks
snowdropie 2 / 4  
Mar 25, 2010   #2
1. Help us for getting it. AND Help us to get it.
I guess 2nd one is a correct use.
I want to know the basic difference between the use of "TO+VERB" and "FOR+VERB-ing".

In this situation, because the first verb is a simple one.

2. I have a confusion for the use of "To+VERB-ing"

When you use this form, it is because the vebal phase before the verb determines the V+ing form.

Eg. I look forward to receive it.
I look forward to receiving it.

I think you should look up some verbs on dictionary, since different verbs apply to different kind of usage.
firmanq 2 / 5  
Mar 25, 2010   #3
what i know is:

Verb+ing, become a noun, usually as a subject of sentence.

example: drinking alcohol become a habit in some countries.

Or you can put it after for

I am responsible for developing....

:-)
EF_Kevin 8 / 13,321 129  
Mar 26, 2010   #4
I want to thank you for contributing this excellent discussion to our forum!

It is hard to answer the question, because it varies so much from one situation to the next.

You can write:
You should pay him for getting it.
He should help us to get it.

"For" and "to" are prepositions.
Google this: preposition list

:-)
OP wilde 2 / 3  
Mar 30, 2010   #5
Thanks to all of you.
EF_Kevin, it would be great if you could explain me further for my second point, too:

2. I have a confusion for the use of "To+VERB-ing"

Eg. I look forward to receive it.
I look forward to receiving it.

When and how should we use "to+VERB-ing".

Thanks again :)
EF_Kevin 8 / 13,321 129  
Mar 31, 2010   #6
Good question! Sorry I missed it before.

Use "to" when you are going to write about:

some kind of process of VERB-ing.

"I look forward to driving."
I look forward to driving the car.
I look forward to walking.
I look forward to going.

The verb becomes like a noun, and it is called a gerund. That way, it can be the object of a sentence.
"I" is the subject.
The verb is the object.
I... verb.... (object)

I like ice cream.
I like eating.
I like to eat.
I like eating.

You know what?? One good way to understand is like this:
eating = to eat.

I can write:
I like to eat.
or
I like eating.

I like to drive to the store.
I like driving to the store.

I like to eat grasshoppers.
I like eating grasshoppers.

But when you ask about this it is different: "I look forward to"---- This is a different way to use "to."

I look forward to receive it. wrong
I look forward to receiving it. right
I look forward to helping you.
I look forward to Friday.
I went to the store.

"To" is used in a lot of different ways, but you will get in good habits if you
read English aloud often
TimMill 9 / 63  
Apr 30, 2010   #7
Prepositions are one of the hardest parts of learning a language for three reasons: 1, They often make no sense at all, 2, there are many, many exceptions, and 3, they don't translate well between languages- while "de" means of in French, a lot of sentences in French written with "de" will not be written with "of" in English. Or in German- "ich warte auf dich" translates word for word to "I am waiting on you", but in English we say "I am waiting for you".

I would strongly recommend a preposition list, like Kevin suggested. Here's a link to one, but you could also google "Phrasal verbs and prepositions".

english-at-home.com/grammar/prepositions-and-verbs/

Try to memorize five a day, and ask someone to quiz you on them. You'll be doing well in no time!

English is tough, but don't give up!


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