Unanswered [1] | Urgent [0]
  

Home / Undergraduate   % width Posts: 3

UC Prompt 1 Constant Moving: a reflection on the importance of education


Kimh 1 / 1  
Nov 16, 2011   #1
I had to help my parents pack up clothes and belongings again. The landlord has raised the rental price and we had to move again. "But I just became friends with the kids down the block and I like it here. Do we really have to move ma?" I've said this phrase so many times but the answer never changes - "Yes, say goodbye" said my mom.

Up until the time when my family and I settled here in Sacramento only about a year ago, we were constantly on the move- as much as twice a year. Because of this unstable life, I had to teach myself how to become accustomed to changes by become self-reliant.

From the struggles my family and I had to face in the Philippine refugee camps to escaping to [City] (where I spend most of my childhood) to entering America in 2005, I probably had lived in fifteen different apartments and attended ten different schools. By the time I reached ten years old, I realized that living as refugee in the Philippines was taking a toll on my education and future. Fortunately, my family and I did not lose hope and after sixteen years of waiting, we finally immigrated to the United States. Now, I have an equal chance to a better education and a brighter future. With this mentality, I invested all my effort to perform optimally in school.

I remember my first day of middle school of in Los Angeles, I walked into the English class and said, "Hi, my name is [my full name]" in my heavy Filipino-Vietnamese accent. Also, conveniently, I was wearing a pair of broken glasses. Overtime, my peers viewed me as a nerd. I was classified as a loner, and then bullied on. I felt alienated; however, I did not tolerate any of this. I stood up against the bullies; I reported them to the counselor. Consequently, they faced suspension. Even though it was not easy to make friends, I did feel the need to fit into the social norm. I chose to be self-reliant and upheld my individuality. My vision focused solely on achieving high academics.

Finally my high school year, I got to meet peers who shared the same passion for high academics as me. I was delighted. This motivated me to further challenge my academic abilities. At the same time, it expanded my personal growth as I joined different clubs and got involved in community service.

I believe that college is a step closer to meet more people who are like me: high-achiever, dedicated to school, and who are proud to express their individualism. Every time I think about education, I get a flashback of myself holding a pencil, sitting in class and thinking "What will I become after school?" Then a pair of vendor bags appears in my hands as I walk to each house to sell some hand-made merchandise to try to make a living (just like my parents did). If I was not destined to come to America, I would not have gotten the chance to go to college. Nothing will ever change. My life would always be unstable. Every summer, I would have to haul my belongings and find a new house. But now every time I think about education, I see a bright future ahead of me where I could pursue a successful career and be able to afford a stable life.

Wytkewicz27 1 / 4  
Nov 18, 2011   #2
This would be a better obstacle essay than one about education. some suggestions would be to tie in how education has transformed through the generations. how now a days we have more chances to go to colleges or more schooling and more knowledge offered. bring knowledge into it more because that is the prompt. you could definitely bring in some of your own experiances because it shows a side of you the audiance does not know but you cant lose your essay in talking about yourself. write more about education
OP Kimh 1 / 1  
Nov 19, 2011   #3
This is my new revision please help me

I had to help my parents pack up clothes and belongings again. The landlord has raised the rental price and demanded us to move out. "But I just some new friends and I like it here. Do we really have to move ma?" I've said this phrase so many times but the answer never changes - "Yes, say your goodbyes" said my mom.

Up until the time when my family and I settled here in Sacramento about 4 years ago, we were constantly on the move- as much as twice a year. Because of this unstable life, I had to learn how to become self-reliant and accustomed to consistent changes.

From facing the struggles in the Philippine refugee camps to escaping to Manila City (where I spend most of my childhood) to finally entering America in 2005, I probably had lived in fifteen different apartments and attended ten different schools. By the time I reached ten years old, I realized that living as refugee in the Philippines was taking a toll on my education and future. Fortunately, my family and I did not lose hope and after sixteen years of waiting, we finally emigrated to the United States. Now, I have an equal access to a better education and a chance to a brighter future. With this mentality, I invested all my effort to perform optimally in school.

I remember my first day of middle school of in Los Angeles, I walked into the English class and said, "Hi, my name is Kim Thuy Ho" in my heavy Filipino-Vietnamese accent. My peers called me a nerd because quite conveniently, I was also wearing a pair of broken glasses. Overtime, I was classified as a loner, and then bullied on. I felt alienated; however, I did not tolerate any of these mistreatments. I stood up against the bullies; I reported them to the counselor, and consequently, they faced suspension. Even though making new friends was hard, I did not feel the need to fit into the social norm. I stayed true to my studious and straight-forward character.

After this bullying experience a new passion grew within me - to solve conflict through resolution, not through hatred. This inspired me to advocate against hate crime. Over the summer of 2011, I collaborated with other youths in the Sacramento community and presented a plan on how to prevent gang violence in front of the Neighborhood Services Department. They agreed to adopt our plan which is to provide more job opportunities and keep more youth involved in school. After this internship, I joined Youth R.I.S.E and I will be facilitating a workshop called Hate Crime Forum in Sacramento High School on December 7th. Our goal is to make an impact on the youth to promote unity and encourage tolerance on diversity.

Higher education is my link to contribute back and make a change in the community. If I was not destined to come to America, I would not have gotten the chance to go to college. Nothing would have ever changed. My life would have been always unstable. Every summer, I would have to haul my belongings and find a new place. But now, I have the chance to afford a stable and promising life. Most importantly, going to college will lead me closer to attaining a higher education, which in turn, will allow me, as a humble individual, to continue my passion to advocate against hate crime.


Home / Undergraduate / UC Prompt 1 Constant Moving: a reflection on the importance of education