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What about the less fortunate ones? SOP - Admission to SCAD


niakeith 1 / 2  
Dec 2, 2012   #1
Statement of Purpose

Society places great emphasis on one's outward appearance. Popularity and acceptance is often given to the girls whose families can afford the Micheal Kors, and the Louis Vutton. But what about the "less fortunate ones", do they not need to feel accepted also?

I was often considered the 'vain' child in the family. Never could I walk past a mirror, glass or even a car without glaring at my reflection. I didn't stalk my reflection because I knew I was such a beautiful creature. The thing was, I understood the importance of appearance. In my teenager eyes it was simple. At all times I must look my best, and if I don't the other girls will not accept me as one of them. Being raised by a single mother, I thought I was less fortunate. I wished my mother would spend just some of our money on flashy clothes, shoes, and purses. Looking back, I realize my mother was wise. In reality I was never "less fortunate". I was always provided nice quality clothes and shoes. But to me they lacked the expensive name brands; the one major thing I felt would bring me popularity and acceptance. Later I realized popularity is nothing compared to confidence. Strangely this inner struggle helped me develop my purpose, a purpose I wouldn't recognize until now. This life journey sowed the seed in my heart and mind that one day I could create something that could provide strength and confidence in a woman's life.

It is my goal to pursue an undergraduate degree in Fashion Design at the Savannah College of Art & Design. My passion to attend Savannah College of Art & Design is almost as strong my passion for fashion. I am most in attracted with Savannah College of Art & Design aspect of professionalism. After extensive research, I believe SCAD's strong since of professionalism and rich academic environment is exactly what I need to succeed.

I started dabbling in the world of fashion during my high school years. I didn't have the expensive labels, but I did have style. I was obsessed with shows like Project Runway, and America's Next Top Model. I was an active member of my high schools Art and Fashion Design club. I even spent my lunch hour in the art room, learning to cut patterns and to use a sewing machine. I was often told "Nia, you have this artsy look. You look like you would go to SCAD or something". When they asked what I wanted to become as an adult, shockingly I would reply a doctor. I wanted to become a doctor to gain money, and power. 'A career in fashion isn't guaranteed, however people will always be sick', was my thought process.

My freshman year of college I majored in biology, with the goal of still becoming a doctor. I thought I loved math and science, until school started. The classes weren't hard; I lacked the interest and the passion. Around my second semester, I realized being a doctor wasn't my natural calling. I was a lost and confused college freshman, without the slightest idea of what to do next. I did what any young adult would do, and asked my mother for advice. She helped me to realize fashion was my passion. Around my friends and family I was the fashion adviser. My clothes were sacred to me. I read my fashion magazines like they were my bible. And I always had the dream of owning my own boutique. She was right fashion makes me happy, fashion is my passion.

The fashion industry is continuously changing and evolving. Fashion designers influence what people wear all around the world. For me fashion is not only about brands, trends or cost. The task a fashion designer is to be able to create something from nothing. They must turn a mere idea into a strong, bold and daring woman. My purpose is to use my passion and help instill confidence in someone's life. I am aware that the fashion industry is difficult. I am without a doubt convinced studying at the Savannah College of Art & Design will give me the foundation I need to excel.

dumi 1 / 6,928 1592  
Dec 4, 2012   #2
Hi niakeith,
Here are my suggestions; : )

But what about the "less fortunate ones", do they not need to feel accepted also?

But what about the less fortunate ones? Don't they need to feel accepted?

I was often considered the 'vain' child in the family.

OMG! can this be true? :D

In my teenager eyes it was simple; At all times I must look my best, and if I don't the other girls will not accept me as one of them.

I changed punctuation : )

I wished my mother would spend just some of our money on flashy clothes, shoes, and pursesmake-up

------------ I did that change it broaden your menu :D
OP niakeith 1 / 2  
Dec 4, 2012   #3
Thank you for the suggestions. Very much appreciated! :)


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