Unanswered [4] | Urgent [0]
  

Home / Undergraduate   % width Posts: 6

Lafayette College SHORT ANSWER (drawing Chinese paintings)


ayida365 7 / 33  
Oct 16, 2009   #1
PROMPT:In an effort to learn more about you, we ask that you describe an intellectual or creative interest or accomplishment.

Characters available 2000

My Article

I started drawing Chinese paintings since I was 7, and it has always been one of my interests.

The Chinese paintings attracted me at the first sight by their flamboyant colors. Every time I observe the bright clothes ancient beauties wearing or the elaborately tinged architectures in the drawing, I feel like coming back to the poetic ancient times. I often regard each painting experience as one trial of creative combination of different colors. That was the reason why I found the endless assignments of line drawings extremely boring at the beginning; I even considered giving up since I had not touched the rouge or azurite a single time for the first two months. However, after nearly one year's black and white, I gradually understood that without the basis of handling lines and manipulating the Chinese brushes (which are very tricky; as they are too pliable, if not enough effort is exerted, the lines will be awry, and if too much strength is imposed, the ink will blot the paper), one can never accomplish a satisfactory work. It is like that one must be skilled in sketches before undertaking oil paintings. The same theory functions well in other things: I must achieve those minor targets before eventually realizing my biggest goals, and I should be down to earth before soaring into the sky.

Right now, what I really love about Chinese paintings becomes their margin leaving: in such a large piece of paper, a plum branch with scarlet blossoms usually occupies only 1/4 of the space, and the left is all blank. This method leaves viewers some expanse to use their imagination, just like the open ending in a novel, quitting while it is ahead and making the aftertaste lingers. That also resembles to real life, where one always has the space to imagine and to hope.
OP ayida365 7 / 33  
Oct 17, 2009   #2
Thanks a lot.
hellokitty930 3 / 8  
Oct 17, 2009   #3
This is such a unique interest to write about.
The only thing I can comment on about this is to get creative with your approach on answering the prompt. If you feel up for it, you can write about the activity as you are drawing, it would be more entertaining to read, and it lets the reader see and feel what you do.
songbird91 /  
Oct 17, 2009   #4
I agree, this is a really interesting topic but you need to start it out better. Begin it by talking about the way you feel when drawing, like you're concentrated but doing something fulfilling concurrently.
OP ayida365 7 / 33  
Oct 18, 2009   #5
And what about this one:

Along with uproarious blow of drums and gongs, the Peking opera began. Conqueror strutted on to the stage, wearing golden robe with war flags on his back, followed by the Queen in a red mantle with blue collar. I gaped at them; astonishment swallowed my words. "You love operas," my father remarked. Actually, what arrested me were performers' flaming costumes. Therefore in Chinese paintings exhibition the other day, observing the vivid ancient folks and the elaborately tinged architectures, I felt like coming back to the poetic antiquity, so I made a decision right away: I will learn Chinese paintings!

I started drawing Chinese paintings since I was 5, and it has always been one of my interests.
Chinese paintings attracted me at first sight by their flamboyance. I often regard each drawing experience as one trial of creative combination of colors. That was why I found the endless assignments of sketches extremely boring at the start; I even considered giving up since I had not touched the rouge or azurite once for two months. However, after nearly one year's black and white, I gradually understood that without the basis of lines and manipulating brushes(which are very tricky: as they are too pliable, if not enough effort is exerted, the lines turn awry, and if too much strength is imposed, the ink will blot the paper), one can never accomplish a masterpiece. The same theory functions well in other things: I must achieve those minor targets before realizing my biggest goals, as I should be down to earth before soaring into the sky.

Now, what I love about this art becomes its margin leaving: in such large paper, a plum branch with scarlet blossoms usually occupies only 1/4 of the space, and the left all blank. This method leaves viewers expanse to use their imaginations, just like the open ending of a novel, quitting while it is ahead and making the aftertaste lingers. That also resembles to real life, where one always has the space to imagine and to hope.
OP ayida365 7 / 33  
Oct 18, 2009   #6
I started drawing Chinese paintings since I was 5

Ummmm...There's a mistake, I meant to type 7...


Home / Undergraduate / Lafayette College SHORT ANSWER (drawing Chinese paintings)