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Stanford: LETTER TO ROOMMATE- love, Chinese girl


cupnoodle123 15 / 52  
Dec 18, 2011   #1
Basically, to me I love what I have written, it seems to encapsulate me perfectly, but unfortunately it is about 600 characters over the limit...

Please help me know which parts are best to cut down or cut out. :) Thanks!!

Write a note to your future roommate that reveals something about you or that will help your roommate - and us - know you better.

In every way, I am a Chinese girl. My cultural exposure in the US for the past fifteen years I have been living here is mixed with my family's style of Hong Kong humor, and basic Asian-ness. Just look at my shelf and you'll find the myriad of English books, right beside the several series of Cantonese and Mandarin comic books I have. While legitimate Chinese texts are still a bit of a struggle for me to read, I adore my Hong Kong cartoons that are written in the dialect and slang of modern Hong Kong and capture the humor and mannerisms of the people there as well. I have many books of an older Cantonese comic series, called Lao Fu Zi, about a stereotypical Hong Kong old man who makes Chinese traditions and modern culture in Asia seem very humorous. I actually love Asian stereotypes and they're not offensive to me because I have learned to appreciate my culture. I find stereotypes hilarious because they are sometimes very true about me, the cultural values passed down to me, and my Asian parents. I watched Ping Pong Playa, a 2007 movie about a Chinese boy undoing Chinese tradition and stereotypes while, ironically, being forced to be a Ping Pong teacher. After about five years, the stereotypes were still so accurate. The movie's motto was "Don't Just Win, Destroy" and I laughed at that reflection of my culture's stereotyped "Tiger-mom"-driven ambition, which actually arose from Confucian values for working hard. I admit I fit some stereotypes: I enjoyed AP classes and sometimes only took them because normal classes covered too little material to keep me interested, I play the violin, and if I'm not, I wish I were a master at chess. But I must say I love my life in America. I like how my friends have their own tastes. At school I have friends who love photography, Tumblr, the internet, and these interests overlap with one another. It got me interested in the internet, beyond just search engines and information, and even though people advise kids to stop living their lives through the internet, I can't ignore how much of people's creativity and bizarre talents is passed through the net. It's not just an internet café, it's an art portfolio that everyone can add things to, and every art can be wildly different from the other. On the internet, I can watch Chinese news and improve my Chinese speaking, keep up-to-date on news about others, finally learn what dubstepping is, or watch the concert-master's violin solo on YouTube and try to mimic it. So I have to face it; only living in my world can get boring sometimes. Can't wait to meet you.
dumi 1 / 6,927 1592  
Dec 19, 2011   #2
While reading legitimate Chinese texts are still a bit of a strugglea hard exercise for me to read , I adore my Hong Kong cartoons that are written in thebecause of their dialect and slang of modern Hong Kong andthat help capture the humor and mannerisms of theHongkong people there as well . I have many booksMy favourite collection of anLao Fu Zi , an older Cantonese comic series calledLao Fu Zi about a stereotypical Hong Kong old manfolk,whomakespresents Chinese traditions and modern culture in Asia seem very humorously . I actually love Asian stereotypes and they're not offensive to me because I have learned to appreciate my culture.


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