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Umichi transfer short answer (respect for differences)


japanese magic 1 / -  
Jan 24, 2009   #1
Share an experience through which you have gained respect for intellectual, social, or cultural differences. Comment on how your personal experiences and achievements would contribute to the diversity of the University of Michigan.

In the silent library of the College, while typing in Chinese on the computer, I found there was breathiness in back of me. It was a janitor who was staring at my computer screen. He didn't notice that I was looking at him. I was curious what indeed he is looking at. Due to my curiousness, I politely asked him a question."Excuse me, would you please tell you what you're looking at?" He found my existence when I asked him the question. And he merely answers, "Nothing. I just found that you mistyped a Chinese letter.

In the place where you can hardly find a Chinese, a native American pointed out the mistake in typing Chinese, which is my native language. I then had a great talk with the mystery American friend. He told me that he learned Chinese on his own. He had been fond of Chinese since he was young. I started to admire him gradually. There was an intense thought growing in my heart, "Where there is a will, there is a way."Afterwards, we often learn thing from each other. He taught me English while I taught him Chinese.

Although Chinese is actually not as important as English is. However, I have been beginning to teach simple Chinese to people who are really interested in that language since I met the native American. Therefore, hopefully, I will be able to meet that kind of people in University so that I can contribute in this subject.

any grammar mistakes or problems in there??if so, please tell me^^

Angela629 9 / 86  
Jan 24, 2009   #2
In the silent library of the College, while typing Chinese on the computer, I found there was breath behind me.

"I was curious why he is looking at the screen ." maybe better, just my suggestion.

Due to my curiousity,I politely asked him, " Excuse me, would you mind to tell me what are you looking at?"

He found my existence when I asked him the question. (you can't say "find existence" here, the whole sentence is just not right. Use "he finally noticed me")

a native American, An American is better. Do you mean local people, if so, that would be local, or just American. Native american means the early indians that inhabited the area. So your sentence would be: I kinda of rewrite the sentence in my meaning, if you wouldn't mind.

"In the place where you can hardly find a Chinese, it's unbelievable that an American pointed out my mistake in my native language."

After that , we often learn things from each other. He teach me English while I teach him Chinese.

Although Chinese is not as important as English is, I have been beginning to teach simple Chinese to people who are really interested in the language since I met my American friend . Therefore, hopefully, I will be able to meet that kind of people in University so that I can contribute in this subject more .

The fact is that we usually call each other friends rather by our ethinic status.

angela
EF_Kevin 8 / 13,334 129  
Jan 25, 2009   #3
How about:

Compelled by my curiosity, I politely asked him a question: "Excuse me, would you please tell you what you're looking at?" He found my existence when I asked him the question. And He merely answers, "Nothing. I just found that you mistyped a Chinese letter.

In a place where I was the only Chinese, a Native American pointed out my mistake in typing Chinese, which is my native language. I then had a great talk with my mysterious American friend.

Although Chinese is actually not as important in the western world as English is, but I have been beginning toteaching simple Chinese to people who are really interested in that language ever since I met that Native American. Therefore I hope I will be able to meet that kind of people like that at your fine University so that I can contribute my knowledge of this subject.
mustaa 7 / 15  
Jan 25, 2009   #4
i think you sort of degrade chinese when you talk about how chinese is actually not as important as English..its just my opinion though
EF_Sean 6 / 3,491  
Jan 25, 2009   #5
When it comes to the issue of the relative importance of Chinese and English, you might want to add some context. If I were trying to find a job in Beijing, for example, it would presumably be more important to know Chinese than English. In America, the reverse is true. So, you can't really say that English is more important than Chinese without giving some context.
KeonYe 6 / 17  
Jan 27, 2009   #6
I then had a great talk with the mysterious American friend.

somehow i agree with mustaa.. it might be abusive for certain people


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