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The unexamined life is unworth living- Stanford


shannon92 15 / 74  
Dec 25, 2009   #1
-Stanford students are widely known to possess a sense of intellectual vitality. Tell us about an idea or an experience you have had that you find intellectually engaging. (2575)

"The unexamined life is not worth living."-Socrates.
These words have resonated with me ever since I first heard them. This statement poses a question, about our human tendency to examine the world around us, and whether our use of technology is beneficial to society. Although the accrual of knowledge is both dangerous and unprecedented, I believe that it is more important for us to aspire to step outside our self defined borders and accept the drawbacks than to sit back and be ignorant to the world around us. The thirst for knowledge is only dangerous if it is reckless and purposeless.

In the novel Frankenstein, Victor irresponsibly seeks after knowledge for no good other than his own curiosity. His ruthless pursuit of knowledge results in a destructive monster that drives him to insanity. Indeed Frankenstein shows us how reckless lust for knowledge can prove dangerous, yet that doesn't mean knowledge should simply not be sought after. If we aren't willing to take any risks, society will never improve.

In an article by Neil Postman, "Informing Ourselves to Death," Postman asserts that, "The human dilemma is as it has always been, and we solve nothing fundamental by cloaking ourselves in technological glory." While an overload of information and technology are not crucial to our basic needs, if we never look for anything greater than ourselves then we will never be grateful for having what we do have, and ultimately it is a life "unworth living."

Despite the fact that Prometheus tales have been taught to us since day one about he who tried to play God and failed miserably, nevertheless when we test our natural boundaries we can learn something very valuable. If responsibly sought after, it can either make us more grateful for having what we already have, or lead us to new innovations that expand the boundaries of the natural human world.
danielhe 4 / 13  
Dec 25, 2009   #2
I am not sure if this kind of writing is what they are looking for. You have an idea that you engage with intellectually but it is just kind of thrown out there and discussed. If it were me, I would write a little more on the day you heard that quote and what you thought. Then talk continue discussing.

This is what I think and I hope it helps!
anhammond 3 / 28  
Dec 26, 2009   #3
i like the other one better
it is more personal than this one

this one had great writing but it is more in a research style than college essay style. if you polish up the other one so that it really shows how intellectually engaged you are then you will have a great essay
EF_Kevin 8 / 13,321 129  
Dec 29, 2009   #4
Although the accrual of knowledge is both dangerous and unprecedented, I believe that it is more important for us to aspire to step outside our self defined borders and accept the drawbacks than to sit back and be ignorant to the world around us.

Hi Shannon, this sentence above is quite chaotic. I think I know what you mean, but you have to really clarify it: Although the accrual of knowledge has produced catastrophic results (i.e. "weapons of mass destruction"), I believe that it also can be the key to avoiding further catastrophe in the future.

I think this is a little like what you are trying to say, right? I don't think you have to include the part about not wanting to "sit back and be ignorant"...

Overall, I really think this essay makes a good impression!
OP shannon92 15 / 74  
Dec 29, 2009   #5
im actually using the other essay i wrote for this one (i am unable to vote...) but thanks anyhow


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