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CATS; Indoor/ Outdoor / Indoor-Outdoor


amosborne13 8 / 17  
Feb 25, 2007   #1
The most commonly owned pet cat is the domestic cat and can be categorized into three groups; indoor domestic cats, outdoor domestic cats, and indoor-outdoor domestic cats. When these cats are clean and sitting next to each other, they appear extremely similar. The different environments these three groups of domestic cats exist in are what make them different in every other way.

Indoor cats are cleaner and healthier, because they are more likely to be taken to the veterinarian. They are safe from predators, cars, abusive humans, and communicable diseases and they do not get lost or stolen. Since inside cats do not have to spend their time looking for food, they have more time to clean themselves and they also are more likely to be overweight. This type of cat tends to be more of a lap cat, than the others. Indoor cats also have downfalls, they do not have a faucet to let out their energy and this sometimes causes them to "climb the walls." City cats need to also be indoor cats, due to all of the dangers.

Outdoor cats spend most of their time looking for food and trying to be safe from predators. his causes them to be skinner and dirtier. They tend to also be a nuisance in the community, knocking over trashcans and tearing up trash. Outdoor cats tear up gardens, when using them for a litter box. They are safer in the country.

Indoor-outdoor cats have the best of both worlds they do not have to look for food and they can go outside for exercise. They also have the bad parts of the outdoor cat. They have a chance of getting into a fight and getting hurt, or hit by a car. Indoor-outdoor cats can get lost or stolen and they can come into contact with communicable diseases. Rural areas are the best for indoor-outdoor cats.

The best way for a cat to be raised depends on the owner's preferences and the living circumstances.

EF_Team2 1 / 1,709  
Feb 26, 2007   #2
Greetings!

I have three kitties, so this is a subject near and dear to my heart! :-))

You make some good points and provide some important information. I do find a few flaws in your logic, though.

"The different environments these three groups of domestic cats exist in are what make them different in every other way." - This sounds like an overstatement to me. They are different in some ways, but surely not "every other way."

"Indoor cats are cleaner and healthier, because they are more likely to be taken to the veterinarian. " - I have to disagree with this. My cats are indoor-outdoor country cats and go to the veterinarian as often as any indoor cat -- whenever they need to.

"This type of cat tends to be more of a lap cat, than the others." - You don't need the comma in this sentence. Also, my indoor-outdoor lap cats might tend to disagree with your assertion.

"Outdoor cats spend most of their time looking for food and trying to be safe from predators." - This is only true if the outdoor cat does not have a caretaker who feeds it, and if predators are present. There are not that many predators who hunt for cats -- although a dog might be a danger, even if not technically a predator who hunts for cats. You are essentially describing feral or semi-feral cats, but there are also tame outdoor cats who do not fit your description.

"Indoor-outdoor cats have the best of both worlds they do not have to look for food and they can go outside for exercise." - This is a run-on sentence. Put a period or semicolon after "worlds."

"The best way for a cat to be raised depends on the owner's preferences ..." - I can't really see what an owner's "preferences" has to do with it. A person might "prefer" to totally neglect his cat, and that would not be "best."

As I said, you have some good information here. I think you just need to be a bit more careful with your word choices. Make sure when you make an assertion that it is factual, and applicable to the specific situation you are describing.

I hope this is helpful to you!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com
OP amosborne13 8 / 17  
Feb 26, 2007   #3
Ok, let me ask you a question, have you only had indoor-outdoor cats. I have had all three types and most of what I wrote is true when comes to my experience. A classification essay is one in which the writer attempts to come to grips with a large issue and reduce it to a size which can both be understood and explained.

Here is the assignment details.

The intention of this essay is to narrow, refine, and clarify. Classification is dependent on a number of factors: who you are, what your background is, and what your intention is in setting up a classification system.Some possible topics to consider are college teachers, fellow class members, churchgoers, TV shows, salesclerks, customers, pets, homes, and movies. The essay length should be five hundred to seven hundred words and any development format or order is acceptable as long as it is a logical order that produces clear meaning for the reader.
EF_Team2 1 / 1,709  
Feb 27, 2007   #4
Greetings!

I've had all three types of cats as well, and I do agree with much of what you wrote. I don't think there's necessarily anything wrong with the information you supply; I was only questioning the way you expressed some of the details of your classifications. It can be tricky trying to narrow, refine, and clarify without making sweeping all-or-nothing statements that are not factually correct when closely analyzed.

Perhaps you should consider slightly revamping your classifications. For example, much of what you say about outdoor cats is entirely true of cats which are feral or semi-feral -- in other words, cats that are not socialized to humans as pets. And indoor cats are certainly more likely to be taken to the vet than cats which do not have "owners" (although, as we all know, "dogs have 'owners,' cats have 'staff' ").

You definitely do a good job of distinguishing the classifications, that is, drawing constrasts between the three types of cats. I just think it's a little misleading to treat all "outdoor" cats as if they are homeless, wild creatures. I agreed with essentially everything you said about indoor-outdoor cats except the implication that indoor cats are taken to the vet more often. How often a cat sees a vet is entirely determined by the devotion (and bank account) of the owner, not by where the cat lives.

I hope this helps to clarify some of my suggestions. :-)

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com
OP amosborne13 8 / 17  
Feb 27, 2007   #5
Well I have changed the topic of my essay. I will post a new topic.
Sorry, I just got upset and was tired. Also I am a firm believer of indoor kitties, because of where I live.
Thanks,
Andrea
EF_Team2 1 / 1,709  
Feb 28, 2007   #6
Hey, no problem! Yes, I know, you're right -- indoor kitties statistically live much longer. When I lived in the city, I didn't let my cat go outside -- cars are too dangerous! Here at the lake, I have a pet door so they can run back inside if they get pestered by other animals -- that's been working well for almost ten years now! I'm always happy to talk to another cat lover! :-))

Get some rest and take care!

Sarah
OP amosborne13 8 / 17  
Feb 28, 2007   #7
Rest is not possible for a mother with a son turning 3 on Friday. :) It is also not possible, because I have 3 indoor male kitties and 2 indoor dogs.

Thanks,
Andrea


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