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Sat essay: Is conscience a more powerful motivation than fame, power or money?


kimuratakuya 10 / 32  
May 13, 2012   #1
People often have two incentives: avarice and conscience. Although avarice can produce temporary passion, only conscience can motives humanities persist consistently. In other words, people often abandon their avarice for money, power or fame for the sake of conscience. Thus, it can be readily stated that conscience is a more powerful motivator than money, power or fame. From US history, one can see how this statement proves to be true.

Compelled by conscience, many northern abolitionists rejected pecuniary tempt to help escaped slaves. In 1850, to placate outraged southern slaveholders, congress passed 'fugitive slave act', which stated that any northern citizens who send a fugitive slave back would get 10 dollars' reward, then an appealing amount. Despite such pecuniary tempt, many northern abolitionists still chose to follow their conscience. Those abolitionists believe that no race is superior enough to prosper on exploitation of another and they are obligated to save fugitive slaves from perils. Motivated by such moral beliefs, abolitionists built Underground Railroad, which helped fugitive slaves escape to Canada from vicious slave hunters. By 1860, more than 100,000 slaves successfully fled to Canada through this route. Thus, in this case, we can see how conscience defeats pecuniary avarice.

Again, conscience overwhelmed concern over money when National Baseball League president Ford Frick approved Dodger's recruitment of Jackie Robinson, the first Negro player in the League. In 1947, when Brookline Dodger boldly offered Robinson a contract, Ford expressed his support with an energetic speech. Unintentionally, his response provoked an outcry among white players and thus incurred potential financial crisis. Informed of his attitude, many racist players, nearly 1\4 of all league players, threatened that they would strike if Ford admitted Robinson. Furthermore, several economists have predicted that League would lose at least 1million if this happened. Though concerned over potential loss, Ford put his conscience on the first place. Ford holed an evangelical belief that in USA, everyone has the right to play as any other, regardless of his or her race. Finally, Ford approved the recruit ion of Robinson with another powerful speech stating that' our League will go down the line with Robinson whatever the consequence', permitting Robinson the first Negro player in League. Thus, we can see, for Ford, conscience was a more powerful stimulus.

Despite cases above showcasing the power of conscience, many people argue that they are more loyal to money or fame. However, people loyal to fame can preserve in the short term while those to consience forever. Even though many tycoons have donated money several years to establish fame as philanthropist, only Mother Teresa can devote her wholelife helping others. Futhermore, as shown in cases above, individuals forsake avarice for moral objectives. Thus, we can conclude that people are more incensed by conscience than money,fame, or power.

Zubaida 18 / 35  
May 14, 2012   #2
People often have two incentives: avarice and conscience.
I think you should explain incentives of what
For example, you can say:

People often have two incentives when setting goals: avarice and conscience.
or
When people try to achieve their goals, they often have two incentives: avarice and conscience.
or
Two common incentives can motivate people to achieve their goals: avarice and conscience.

However, people loyal to fame can preserve in the short term while those to consienceconscience forever.

FuthermoreFurthermore , as shown in cases above, individuals forsake avarice for moral objectives.

I hope this will help.
Good Luck.
OP kimuratakuya 10 / 32  
May 14, 2012   #3
Thank you. I really appreciate your moderations.


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