Unanswered [7] | Urgent [0]
  

Home / Writing Feedback   % width Posts: 3

Eulogy of Morrie schwartz by Charlotte schwartz.


Dude 3 / 9  
Mar 10, 2011   #1
This is a Eulogy written by me that would have been told by Charlotte Schwartz at Morrie's funeral. I had to infer many things since there wasn't much information given about her in the book. Thanks in advance for all the help, I appreciate it. Eulogy:

Morrie once said "Dying is only one thing to be sad over... Living unhappily is something else". Morrie Schwartz was a remarkable person, a wonderful husband, a loving father and professor. His loving personality has touched and changed the lives of many people around the world including his students, family, friends, and people who have been fortunate to learn about him through Nightline. Most importantly, he has changed my life and my outlook of the world.

When I first met Morrie 46 years or so ago, what drew me to him were his kindness and his vibrant attitude about life. Although I was a bit of a recluse, Morrie was one of the few individuals who could bring me out of my shell. Before I met Morrie, I was not as forgiving or kind to others as I would have like to have been. That would all change after meeting Morrie Schwartz. My entire beliefs and the methods in which I would interact with regular people and strangers have changed for the best within a short time after marrying Morrie. I began to start trusting people again and giving them the benefit of the doubt, all under the indirect influence of Morrie.

Indeed, Morrie always had a way to bring the best out of the most cold and distant of people. As Morrie once said "After you have wept and grieved for your physical losses, cherish the functions and the life you have left". Morrie is in a better place right now, and he would appreciate it if I moved on with my life. Although Morrie may not be with us anymore physically, he will continue to live on in our most fondest memories. In his memory, I will comfort families who have lost loved ones to ALS and help raise awareness around the world for this deadly disease. I will also be much more open and compassionate person, in memory of Morrie.

Morrie's favourite poet once said "Among those whom I like or admire, I can find no common denominator, but among those whom I love, I can: all of them make me laugh". Morrie would always laugh at the most bland of jokes, just to preserve a good moment. Most people who met Morrie would grow to love him after knowing him for such a short while. For such a highly intelligent and complex man, Morrie was simple in expressing himself and aphorisms were a favorite of his. In one to three sentences, Morrie would get people to question their beliefs and values. Fortunately, this has changed many people for the better. Most importantly, his aphorisms have had a powerful affect on me and my disposition of people. Although neither of us earned handsome salaries and paying the bills were difficult at times, his aphorisms and their stance against our capitalist culture is what made us truly cherish our lives. This is another valuable life lesson that I have learned from Morrie, that a person's worth is not relative to their salary and their materal posessions.

Morrie lived a long good life, filled with love and security. He lived a simple life free of materalistic pursuits and placed emphasis on the greater things in life, such as love and companionship. This is what I believe is missing from most people's lives, and if we were only half as understanding with each other, then there would not be as much wars or hate in this world. There are many things I will miss about Morrie, but the most that will stick with me and I will continue to practice is his kindness and understanding towards all people. Morrie may be resting in peace now, but his aphorisms will continue to live on and change people for the better. Morrie will remain alive in the people's lives that he has changed, as he once said "The best way to deal with that is to live in a fully conscious, compassionate, loving way. Don't wait until you're on your deathbed to recognize that this is the only way to live".

EF_Kevin 8 / 13,335 129  
Mar 12, 2011   #2
Most importantly, he has changed my life and my outlook of the world.

I think you can say something more meaningful at the end of the first paragraph. Instead of just saying he changed your outlook, which the reader could figure out on her own, you can give a sentence that really expresses the insight you gained... can you find words for it?

Then, after giving the important sentence, the paragrpah break gives the reader the opportunity to think for a second about what you said.

Although neither of us earned handsome salaries, and paying the bills were was difficult at times, his aphorisms and their stance against our capitalist culture is what made us truly cherish our lives.

Paying...---> was...

Use a comma:
...once said, "The best way to deal with that is to live in a fully conscious, compassionate, loving way. Don't wait until you're on your deathbed to recognize that this is the only way to live."

This is very good writing!
OP Dude 3 / 9  
Mar 12, 2011   #3
Thanks for all the help!!
Appreciate it!


Home / Writing Feedback / Eulogy of Morrie schwartz by Charlotte schwartz.