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Home ownership and renting comparison for 1991 and 2007, in percentage term in the UK.


tuan26816 1 / -  
Jul 16, 2019   #1

the percentage of housing owned and rented in the UK in 1991 and 2007



The pie charts compare home ownership and renting for 1991 and 2007 in percentage term in the UK.

Overall, home ownership was the most significant part of five types and social housing contributed the least in the UK of all homes

Looking the pie charts, the number of housing owned was amount of 55% and 65% in 1991 and 2007 respectively. This is an increase approximately 10% compared with 1991. At the beginning, there were about 15% of private renting and in 2007, it is accounted for nearly 15% . This is no change about the million homes in UK at two period.

In 1991, the percentage of social renting is approximately 25%. However, there were 15% of house which is rented by the social.This is an decreased about 10% of social renting compared with 2007. Social housing has decreased three-fold from 6% in 1991 to 2% in 2007, and it remains the least popular type of housing.

Maria [Contributor] - / 1,047 372  
Jul 16, 2019   #2
@tuan26816
Hello there. Welcome to the forum. Next time, it would be helpful to provide the charts or graphs to assist us in providing you with feedback on your writing. Regardless, I'm going to try my best!

The first two paragraphs can be merged to form a more concrete introductory paragraph. Try to also separate your thoughts altogether. For instance, if a line can be divided into two separate lines,opt for two lines. This will help you simplify your sentences, making your overall structure easier to work with.

Furthermore, try to also ensure that your tone is consistently formal. You can do this through making sure that your articles are in proper placement - and that you're not using informal words throughout.

Best of luck.


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