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A report on an organism


xxalixx 3 / 2  
Jan 27, 2008   #1
i've written a report on crickets and i think the thesis is kind of weird and can someone help with editing the whole report? thanks.

Acheta domesticus is known as the "house cricket". They are possibly native to south western Asia. However, in the 18th century house crickets are found in Canada, eastern United States, south California and northern Europe. The reason for their distribution to other parts of the world is caused by human beings. House crickets have interesting features; there are also natural factors that affect their growth, survival and behaviour.

For house crickets' descriptions, they are approximately 2cm in size; including their 1.5cm oval body and 0.5cm thin antennae. They are yellowish-brown in colour with a black or dark brown pattern displaying on their head and thorax. Moreover, they have black compound eyes on the side of their head. House crickets also have three pairs of legs. Their hind legs are bigger and stronger than the other front pairs, and they are qualified for jumping and escaping from predators. Besides crawling, they have wings that cover their abdomen which allow them to fly. Another function of the wings is for the male cricket to sing to attract females or get attention for other male crickets to fight. Furthermore, female crickets have a long narrow structure at the end of their abdomen, which is their ovipositor. The function of the long ovipositor is for laying eggs on the ground. For nymphs, they look like adults when they are hatched, but they do not have wings and genital organs yet. The house crickets are found outdoors; in places such as pastures, meadows and shores. They may live in garbage dumps, because fermentation creates heat for them. During the winter, they may need to live in buildings or warm places to keep them alive.

Temperature and light intensity are abiotic factors that affect house crickets. The usual range of temperature which keeps them alive is around 80°F to 90°F. In this range of temperature, crickets take roughly two to three months to complete their life cycles. In addition, they are more inactive in cold temperature, but they are active and amaze at everything in warm temperature. Temperature also affect the period of time the nymphs take to mature. In areas that are approximately 80°F, nymphs usually require sixty to sixty-five days to mature; on the other hand, nymphs that live in 90°F only require thirty to thirty-five days to mature. Another interesting feature of crickets associated with higher temperature is that male crickets' songs happen to be louder and faster. For light intensity, house crickets are strongly attracted to light, but they are mostly active during the night time.

House crickets have few sensory organs that help them with finding food, finding a mate, laying eggs and detecting noises. The ovipositor is a taste sensory organ, which helps crickets to know where they should lay their eggs. Tympanum is another sense organ which helps crickets to detect sounds. The long thin antennae are sensory organs that help crickets to find food and find a mate. Usually, house crickets feed on organic matter, but they may eat other insects as well. Some of the predators for crickets are spiders, wasps, ground beetles, birds, small rodents and lizards. Therefore, in the food chain, house crickets act as a prey and a predator.

A biotic factor that affects house crickets is competition. House crickets are closely related to grasshoppers and locusts. They are creating a competition with the house crickets for food, because the type of food that they all consume is quite similar. They also compete for habitat in the natural environment. There are many insects that are similar to house crickets' lifestyle; therefore, there must be competition for house crickets.

House cricket can be an interesting organism. Moreover, they are harmless, because they do not attack human beings or mammals. Nevertheless, their chirping noises can be harmful to the ears!

EF_Team2 1 / 1,709  
Jan 29, 2008   #2
Greetings!

I think your essay contains a lot of good information! I'm a little unclear as to what sentence is supposed to be the thesis; I don't really see a clear thesis statement. You could start off by saying what you say at the end: that they are interesting organisms which are harmless to humans and other mammals. Here are some other editing suggestions:

Acheta domesticus is known as the "house cricket". They are possibly native to southwestern Asia. However, in the 18th century house crickets could be found in Canada, the eastern United States, southern California and northern Europe. The reason for their distribution to other parts of the world is caused by human beings. - You need to explain this attribution; how did humans cause this?

House crickets are approximately 2cm in size, including their 1.5cm oval body and 0.5cm thin antennae. They are yellowish-brown in colour with a black or dark brown pattern displaying on their head and thorax. Moreover, they have black compound eyes on the sides of their head.

The nymphs look like adults when they are hatched, but they do not have wings and genital organs yet. House crickets are found outdoors, in places such as pastures, meadows and shores.

but they are active and amaze at everything in warm temperature. - It should be "amazed" but I'm not sure that's an appropriate word to describe a cricket; it would be difficult to tell whether a cricket was amazed by something. :-)

For light intensity, house crickets are strongly attracted to light, but they are mostly active during the night time. - Rather than saying things like "For light intensity" it would be better to use a stronger lead-in like "Light intensity also affects the activity level of house crickets."

Some of the predators for crickets are - Better would be "Crickets' predators include..." or "Predators of crickets include..."

There are many insects that are similar to house crickets' lifestyle; therefore, there must be competition for house crickets. - This is a little confusing. For one thing, "lifestyle" is not really an appropriate word for an insect. Also, "there must be competition" can be interpreted as having more than one meaning. You have really already said this in the foregoing sentences, so you could eliminate this one.

Good job!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com


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