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Application Essay 1, Free from Gen Ed requirement


timmy0110 3 / 3  
Mar 28, 2014   #1
How would you use this freedom from gen ed requirements to shape your academic choices and better achieve your academic and career goals?

My true passion is at the crossroad of two fields while hovering over by yet another discipline. The freedom from fulfilling college area requirements does not represent an escape from taking "boring" classes; instead such freedom gave way to the pursuit of a more complete education. The multidisciplinary education in which I am aiming for is the combination of arts, sciences, and leaderships. The freedom from the requirements will allow me to pursue this interdisciplinary field to a much more complete capacity.

February 5th, 2014, a night that lightened my path with those spotlights on the floor of John Paul Jones Arena. Singing the Star-Spangled Banner has always been an honor and a privileged, yet it could also be frightening at times. The significance and importance of the National Anthem reigned as that simple tone revealed the true meaning of being an American. Lives were lost and blood was shed so that the flag of fifty stars and thirteen stripes can be flown over the sky. Behind its rich and incredible history, the performance of the National Anthem holds the intensity so strong unmatched by any other presentations. How can such an occurrence be even more emotionally grueling? Those 10,853 Wahoos in the seats of John Paul Jones Arena may be the answer. As the lyrics and tones flowed through my vocal cord, I could not help but to notice the feelings in the air as they triggered countless emotions of pride in the stand that night. Confident was key in giving the performance with thousands pairs of eyes watching; commitment was decisive in perfecting the music and going through with the performance.

In the corner of a small laboratory in the Medical Research Building Four, the singer that sang the National Anthem just two nights ago was found with a lab coat on, slowly and patiently slicing the tissues and carefully performing the procedure to ensure that the next thing being detached by the blade would not a part of his fingers. All of a sudden, the timer went off in the adjacent room. The ringing alarm served as a constant reminder of the motivation and fuel behind all these tedious tasks that many children's futures depend on the advancements of these experiments as ways to foresee and prevent diseases progressions were investigated.

With hope and enthusiasm, I proudly marched over to the next room at the sound of the alarm and began to examine samples under the microscope, hoping for signs of positive results. The interpretation of the image illustrated yet another irrelevant conclusion. Filled with disappointment on my return to the room, I encountered a child who has been administrated into the University hospital for a genetic disorder. The joy and laughter shared between the child and his family was taken in as a reboot for the disappointment of negative results. Knowing eventually positive signs will have to turn out and when it does, an enormous step would have been taken forward in sustaining that smile on not one or two but thousands of children's faces all over the world for generations to come. Determination and initiative, two words written on the wall of the lab, were the reason I stayed on that dull pathway of scientific discovery.

Both occasions were significant as they symbolized aspects of a greater area of study that hovered over the academic successes I am on the trail of chasing. It takes commitment and confident to perform the National Anthem on the floor of John Paul Jones Arena. It required initiative and determination to try to go down a seemingly dead end road of the battle against illnesses. Commitment, confident, initiative, and determination were four qualities that demonstrated leadership. Leadership, defined by the pioneer of Leadership Study Warren Bennis, is the capacity to translate vision into reality, instead of the common misconception that leadership is defined by titles, positions, and powers. Driven by the qualities of leadership, I thrive on the knowledge of knowing I assisted in making a difference, and I prosper on the comprehension of seeing visions turned into realities. The freedom will facilitate my chase of a complete education to a greater depth.

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Thank you all for the help!! Please do NOT hesitate to rip this apart!

admission2012 - / 481 90  
Mar 31, 2014   #2
What on earth is this? You are applying for a special "Honors" program at one of the nations greatest public universities. There is no need to write a story here. Just simply state why having the freedom to take whatever courses you want will be beneficial to your future career aspirations of becoming a doctor or researcher. Talk about a few of the courses you would explore with this new-found freedom that you would not risk otherwise? This is what this program is looking for. - Admissions Advice Online
eddies [Contributor] 25 / 1,195 459  
Apr 22, 2014   #3
Commitment, confident, initiative, and determination were four qualities that demonstrated leadership. Leadership, defined by the pioneer of Leadership Study Warren Bennis, is the capacity to translate vision into reality, instead of the common misconception that leadership is defined by titles, positions, and powers.

This part is too theoretical. You need to write more practical experience. This is much more better to attract the readers enjoy your essay. Good luck for your application


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