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Claremont McKenna: , who has helped shape culture and thought


ericpark 2 / 9  
Jan 2, 2010   #1
I was actually hoping to write an ode to Machiavelli. An Italian sonnet to him as kind of a tribute.

I didn't realize the difficulty, hahaha. Anyone think this is a good idea. I was hoping to be a little more creative and original.

Here it what I have so far.

The mob will turn for inward joy or glee,
Naméd virtue, freedom, vigor, power
Thy troops yielded: anon nobles cower
Reduced by its own roots; A broken tree
Thy chamber breached: to flee and/or to plea
marycornell 2 / 19  
Jan 2, 2010   #2
I think it could result in an amazing poem
but how long were you planning to make it?
I think it might be too much work and may not have enough details that the admin want to see.

I'm also applying to CMC and I think you can tell more in an essay because it does not have the severe limitations as a poem does.

What you have so far is amazing though!

Depending on how long you're going to make it, it might not have a thorough response and I think the admin might get tired of reading in verse for too long.

All in all, too much work. Make it easier on yourself. It's original but could hurt more than help you.
OP ericpark 2 / 9  
Jan 2, 2010   #3
Merged:

Claremont McKenna: Sonnet to Niccolo Machiavelli



Topic: Leadership is a constant theme and emphasis at CMC. In fact, one of the ways we describe CMC students is "Leaders in the Making." Identify and discuss a person, fictional or nonfictional, who has helped shape culture and thought. You may select someone from any field: literature, the arts, science, politics, history, athletics, business, education, etc.

Hoping to paste this in word for word any critique would be great!!! Thanks in advance for reading.

Niccolo Machiavelli, the writer of The Prince
In honor of Niccolo Machiavelli's infamous The Prince, I have written a Petrarchan (Italian) Sonnet as an ode.

1.) The mob will turn for inward joy or glee, [A]
2.) Naméd virtue, freedom, vigor, power, [B]
3.) Thy troops yielded: anon nobles cower. [B]
4.) Reduced by its own roots; a broken tree. [A]
5.) Thy chamber breached: to flee and/or to plea [A]
6.) The hour hath come, the ring of the tower, [B]
7.) Authority slighted, elite devoured: [B]
8.) Thy crown shattered and death of thee: [A]
9.) Discord, disorder, distress define kingship. [C]
10.) Thus how to rule or sway or lead thy herd [D]
11.) Mercy or fear remains power's puzzle. [E]
12.) Consult The Prince and thus its text equip [C]
13.) Whether moral or wrong its lines are heard: [D]
14.) Let fear of death be thy subject's muzzle [E]
bellcicle - / 2  
Jan 2, 2010   #4
I'm sorry, I would really love to return the favor and help, but I honestly know absolutely nothing about poetry.
EF_Kevin 8 / 13,321 129  
Jan 12, 2010   #5
Ha ha, very good. I think the reader will surely be impressed, especially if s/he is familiar with the work of Mach. I really hope s/he is familiar, because otherwise the greatness of this might be lost on him/her.

I have never seen and/or used in a poem!! You are smart.

I have no criticism to give, except that perhaps sme criticism is due for Mach. It might be nice to include some lines of adminission for his ruthlessness -- but that would be contrary to the theme of the poem. Still, it could be done. I mean, if an equally eloquent ode to Cicero was given by another student, wouldn't the reader tend to favor the Cicero poem?

Anyway, I have no criticism to give, because this is a great work of art already.


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