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Reading response to "Talking Up Close"


colla26 5 / 1  
Sep 3, 2007   #1
Hi there, I have two write two parapraphs.
In the first paragraph I have to give the title of the article, the author's name, and the main points of the article. Only major points and not details or examples.

In the second paragraph I have to answer the following questions:
A. In your culture is it generally more acceptable to agree or argue in conversations? Explain your response.
B. Have you had to change your conversational style when talking with Americans? Why or Why not?

I would like to have a feedback on my writing and how well I answered the questions in the second paragraph. Please check on grammar, writing style.

Thank you so much in advance. Again, I really appreciate your time and effort.
I am happy to get any kind of feedback on this essay.
Thanks, Colla26

Essay:

Reading Response to "Talking up Close"

The article "Talking Up Close" was written by Deborah Tannen, and is a excerpt from Tannen's book called "Talking From 9 to 5", published in 1994. The article is classified in two sections. The heading of the first section is called "Fighting to Be Friends" where Tannen gives examples that demonstrate how male more likely establish a strong status and connection to others through both verbal and active fighting than females. Tannen shows that this aggressive behavior results rather for the sake of fun than from mutually animosity motives. In addition, Tannen used real-life examples of different cultures to illustrate that there are a variety of ways and styles of fighting by having arguments in order to show friendliness and to create connections to others. In the second section, called "Is It You or Me?" Tannen is pointing out that no one style of speaking is superior. The real meaning or motive of any conversation cannot ...

Rajiv 55 / 400  
Sep 3, 2007   #2
Hello Colla,

Sarah is doing all the work here, and she will be shortly offering you '..a few editing suggestions.'

I'm just hanging around, enjoying the different personalities and cultures, which I can glean. I really loved your ungrammatical articulateness about your feelings and experiences in America. I lived ten years in US and am now since last couple of years in Europe, so your comments struck a specially picquant note.

Keep going strong!

Rajiv
EF_Team2 1 / 1,709  
Sep 3, 2007   #3
Greetings!

I do, indeed, have "a few editing suggestions" for your interesting essay! :-))

Reading Response to "Talking up Close"

The article "Talking Up Close" was written by Deborah Tannen, and is an excerpt from Tannen's book called "Talking From 9 to 5,"published in 1994. The article is classified in two sections. The heading of the first section is called "Fighting to Be Friends" where Tannen gives examples that demonstrate how males are more likely to establish a strong status and connection to others through both verbal and active fighting than females. Tannen shows that this aggressive behavior results rather for the sake of fun than from [delete mutually]animosity motives. In addition, Tannen used real-life examples of different cultures to illustrate that there are a variety of ways and styles of fighting by having arguments in order to show friendliness and to create connectionsto others. In the second section, called "Is It You or Me?" Tannen is pointing out that no one style of speaking is superior. The real meaning or motive of any conversation cannot befound out, by simply looking at the linguistic strategies that are used. The effect of what people say may differ from the real intention of a conversation. All interactions people have causes double meaning of status and connection by making their own rules about the meaning of words. [this sentence does nto really make sense; try rewriting it]Therefore, the same linguistic terms can mean one or many things, sometimes even both at the same time.

In my culture, Germany, it is generally more acceptable to argue in conversations. German people like to say what they think and therefore would never agree to something in order to avoid confrontations with others. In fact, German people like to debate about a lot of issues such as religion, education and politics, without being shy to express themselves in a direct and straight forward way. German people argue in conversations more likely to represent their own point of view and interest on a topic rather than trying to be contentious and impolite to others. This conversational style among Germans helps not only to get to know a person better but also to precipitatea connection to people who are involved in the discussion.

Indeed, I had and still have to change my conversational style when talking with Americans. I quickly realized that the conversational style in the United States differs a lotfrom the way Europeans talk to each other. Among German companions, I usually express my feelings and opinions in a direct and straightforward way. The reason why I cannot converse like this with Americans is because they easily get irritated, upset and offended [delete by]. In addition, when having a conversation with Americans I always have to choose my words and terms wisely in order not to make a wrong impression. Another reason why I have to change my conversational style is because Americans have certain expectations about how to responds to certain questions and phrases. For example, when Americans ask me a question such as "How are you?" I would responds exactly how Americans expect me to answer, with such empty phrases as "I am doing fine" instead of clearly expressing myself about how I really feel, like I do at home, among Germans.

That's very interesting, about how Germans converse differently from Americans! Good work!

Thanks,

Sarah, EssayForum.com


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