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Posts by sunny_joy
Joined: Dec 26, 2012
Last Post: Dec 30, 2012
Threads: 4
Posts: 16  
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From: Canada

Displayed posts: 20
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sunny_joy   
Dec 30, 2012
Undergraduate / The Alchemist ; NYU /What intrigues you? [13]

Hey! I think it's a well written essay...but you never actually said "what intrigues me is..." LOL, maybe just add that in there!
sunny_joy   
Dec 30, 2012
Undergraduate / hard work and dedication/ UVA Sup - World you come from [9]

I think it's a strong essay...but perhaps you should focus on the description of your world. It's an interesting story, but I don't think it represents your world :)

Good luck!
sunny_joy   
Dec 30, 2012
Undergraduate / I kept silent about my sickness; UCHICAGO Supp - (SILENCE) [9]

But, over the years, every time I tell my parents about any symptoms, I notice mother's eyes dilate but no tears, her face swells, her hands sweats, as she begins to calmly but urgently order my father on the routine. this is a run on sentence

If there was one thing i took away from thiscapitalize the I

woah! what an intense essay!
sunny_joy   
Dec 30, 2012
Undergraduate / "What they don't know won't hurt them"; Stanford Supp/ Intellectual Vitality [20]

Tee hee :)
I think its great that you had some fun with this essay...although I must say, you did have some pretty intense ideas in there! The only thing is, I'm not sure if it says the most about you...but then again, I'm not certain what Harvard officers are looking for. I sure liked it!
sunny_joy   
Dec 29, 2012
Undergraduate / Difference between raw and cooked egg/ Stanford Intellectual Vitality [9]

Hey Guys! Please edit my second draft (i am over by 33 characters) please help me! Thanks~

Stanford students possess an intellectual vitality. Reflect on an idea or experience that has been important to your intellectual development.

The natural response to "What is the difference between a raw egg and a cooked egg?" should be mundane comments about the variation in taste and texture. But I say that the fundamental difference is that a cooked egg will never, ever hatch.

As an inquisitive kindergartener, I felt strongly about justifying my understanding of the book "The Ugly Duckling" through hatching my own eggs. So, with a baby-blanket, a carton of eggs from my fridge, I began my seemingly flawless plan. When the chicks didn't come out after three weeks, I blamed my baby-blanket for not being warm enough. Only after I ended up with hard boiled eggs did I realize that my chicks were gone for good.

Over the years, I concluded that there something inherently wrong with my hatching abilities. It wasn't until I learned about meiosis and reproduction in grade 11 biology that I understood the science behind hatching chickens. An egg, completed with its own air compartment and food supply, can turn into a fully functioning-and insanely adorable- organism just twenty-one days after fertilization. Furthermore, I have been especially curious about the way biological structures grow, astonished by the level of detail in the natural design of these organisms. To my defense however, I did reacted with a sassy "and-now-you-tell-me that" glare when I found out that grocery-store eggs were never fertilized.

Just as my lack of scientific knowledge led to the failure of my hatching projects, the true purpose of education is to equip students with knowledge and the ability to apply it to various areas of life. Like the chicken-egg paradox, knowledge cannot be fruitful unless it is fertilized by passion and curiosity, a student's innate urge to learn. Likewise, curiosity is also useless without knowledge; they coexist. Therefore, I want to go to go to college to allow my intellectual curiosity to guide my learning.

In the end, I my egg never hatched. But why dwell on that? These days, I have moved on to growing mushrooms under my kitchen sink.
sunny_joy   
Dec 27, 2012
Undergraduate / Visual art and in business/ The cicada ; NYU App/ Program? What intrigues you? [8]

A. NYU's global network provides students with hundreds of academic areas of interest for students to cultivate their intellectual curiosity and to help achieve their career goals. Whether you are entirely undecided about your academic plans or you have a definitive program of study in mind, what are your own academic interests? Feel free to share any thoughts on any particular programs or how you might explore those interests at NYU on any of our campuses.

For fourteen years, I have been analyzing literature and solving math problems in the traditional education system. I am grateful to have received this foundation education. But in successfully solving a math problem that already has an answer, I am not truly contributing to society. I believe that knowledge cannot be achieved through tunnel vision. It is a complex web of connections spun with years of learning. But the true spinster is an individual's passion. Yet, without this passion, even if a fully functioning web is forcefully spun, it will lack application and, ultimately, be wasted. In college, I want to explore my intellectual curiosity and let my passion guide my education.

I am passionate about visual art and business. In high school, I have created many entrepreneurial projects that integrates my artistic interests with my business approach. Namely, two years ago, I founded a not for profit initiative called Wallet Farm. Using the concept of "micro-enterprise supporting micro-enterprise", Wallet Farm encourages youths to actively contribute to ending poverty through selling handmade, animal shaped wallets that I designed. On a global scale, the money we raised is used to purchase livestock, a sustainable source of income, that provide food and offspring to developing communities.

I hope that through my four years at the Gallatin school of Individualized Study, I can explore both my interest in visual art and in business, further defining the delicate relationship between the two subjects. Similarly, upon viewing SexPosed, the Gallatin fashion show online, I believe that the interdisciplinary nature of the school enables me to continue to thrive in a culture of innovation, whether its taking classes in 1 Washington place, or being a part of the larger NYU community. In this fast pace world that is driven by passion and innovation, I am prepared to take the next step on my journey at New York University.

B. What intrigues you? Tell us about one work of art, scientific achievement, piece of literature, method of communication, or place in the world (a film, book, performance, website, event, location, etc.), and explain its significance to you.

Silver needles of light pierce through the green dome that sways and ruffles to the humid breeze. Beads of perspiration trail from the hair line to the temples, down the dampened neck before finally dissolving into the soiled collar. A slight hum tickles the ears as the wind halts. Like little propellers of a helicopter preparing to take off, the hum increases to a loud buzz, "çŸĽäş†ïźŒ 知了..." (pronounced "zhiliao, zhiliao" in Chinese). It's the cicadas telling us "Yes, of course we know..."

I have spent many of my childhood summers lying underneath a tree and listening to the songs of cicadas. The cicada lives underground for up to seventeen years before emerging from its nymph skin. It comes out a florescent green insect, but manages to turns completely black in a matter of a few hours. Yet, what intrigues me the most about the cicada is the fact that after it emerges from underground, it only has seven days to find a mate with its song before its death.

In Chinese culture, the cicada is a symbol of rebirth. Its song closely resembles "知了" (zhiliao), the chinese word for "understand". For that reason, people personify the insect, claiming the cicada, after years of meditation underground, lives in the moment and enjoys the scarce time it has. Yet, perhaps, the true value of the cicada is that people live vicariously through it. We all want to live in the present, and be grateful for what we have. I must thank the cicada for teaching me that life is short. Let us cherish it.
sunny_joy   
Dec 26, 2012
Undergraduate / The difference between raw egg and cooked egg/ Stanford sup/intellectual development [3]

Stanford students possess an intellectual vitality. Reflect on an idea or experience that has been important to your intellectual development.

The difference between a raw egg and a cooked egg is that a cooked egg will never, ever hatch. Unfortunately, I learned that the hard way.

When I was five years old, I self-righteously decided to hatch my own egg because my mom refused to buy me a baby chick, the typical pet for children where I grew up. So, with a baby-blanket, a carton of eggs from my fridge and vague knowledge regarding egg incubation, I began my seemingly flawless plan. However, after three weeks, the chicks didn't come out. Initially, I blamed my baby-blanket for not being warm enough; only after I ended up with hard boiled eggs did I realize that my chicks were gone for good.

Over the years, I made several more attempts to hatch eggs, all of which failed epically. I finally had an "eurika!" moment in grade 11 biology when I learned about meiosis and reproduction and realized that grocery-store eggs were never fertilized. Since then, I had been interested in the way things grow. It's unfathomable how biological structures in nature that occurred by chance, is more advanced and perfected than man-made technology.

I finally concluded that not only was there something inherently wrong with my hatching abilities, it was my lack of scientific knowledge that lead to the failure of my hatching projects. Similarly, I understood that the true purpose of education was to equip students with knowledge and the ability to apply it to various areas of life. An egg, completed with its own air compartment and food supply, can turn into a fully functioning-and insanely adorable- organism just twenty-one days after fertilization. Like the chicken-egg paradox, knowledge cannot be fruitful unless it is fertilized by passion and curiosity, a student's innate urge to learn. Likewise, curiosity is also useless without knowledge; they coexist. I want to go to go to college to allow my intellectual curiosity to guide my learning.

In the end, I learned how to make hard-boiled eggs but never successfully hatched an egg. But why dwell on that? These days, I have reverted to growing mushrooms under my kitchen sink.

-want for chicken, curious about how it came out...description

What Matters to me and Why
There is a place in this world, a white, empty box, with no content nor boundaries. In this box, there's no one to walk to; no life flourishes here. A place so baron, callous and denuded that the only sound is the fizzle of brain cells dying. It is the human mind in the absence of motivation.

Now, don't get me wrong. I have only ever dissected a pig brain. I don't really know what the human mind looks like. What I do know, however, is that during parent teacher interviews last year, my english teacher questioned my mother very sternly, "Julia's enthusiasm lights up the whole room! Why does she never run out of energy?" And being me, I wasn't satisfied with just a rhetorical question. I set out to find the answer.

My family, for one, was always there for me, encouraging me whether it's when I spoke at the Canadian Business Hall of Fame, or when I performed my own piano composition in front of the whole school. Going to school also gives me energy. Obviously, I too have those days when learning the "gerondif" conjugation of the verb "savoir" seldom seems essential to the greater good of mankind. But, when my entire school gathers for "prayers" in the morning, and the collective melody of our voices circulate the field of green and gold uniforms, I get shivers that fuel my enthusiasm for the whole day. I also get very excited when I am working with Wallet Farm, a not-for-profit initiative I founded in order to use the concept "micro-enterprise supporting micro-enterprise". When the Wallet Farm community gathers and hand-make wallets to help developing communities halfway across the globe, I am motivated to continue making a difference.

Yet, it wasn't until I stumbled upon Herman Melville's quote " We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men." did I realize that my true motivation is my community. Whether it's my family, my school, or Wallet Farm, we are all interconnected by our care for one another. (elbows?)

I sincerely thank my community for shaping me into becoming who I am today, and for sparing my mind from being a baron boxes with the sound of brain cells dying.

because we are social creatures

-just because we don't see it, doesn't mean it doesn't exist: elbows that are rough
family community: not lonely, encouragement, support from others